Lyme Disease is a growing problem in Lunenburg county. The Municipality has committed to funding and working in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada on a three-year bait station research project, and with Nova Scotia Public Health on an educational campaign.

Notice: The August 8 issue of the Progress Bulletin contains a significant error. On the second page of the story “Pretty tick assassins growing in popularity,” article writer Charles Mandel writes “In a Public Health Agency of Canada-led tick reduction program, the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg is working with Orkin Canada, a pest control company, to launch a residential pesticide spraying program in Nova Scotia.”

This is incorrect. Orkin is a private company operating their own private spraying service and has no relationship with the Municipality or the Public Health Agency of Canada. Neither the Municipality or the Public Health Agency of Canada is spraying pesticides on public or private properties.

Frequently Asked Questions

Which ticks transmit Lyme Disease?

The blacklegged tick (or deer tick) can transmit Lyme Disease. The American Dog Tick does not transmit Lyme Disease.

How do I do a tick check?

Carefully inspect yourself for any ticks, starting at your ankles and moving up. Take special care around your knees, armpits and head. Blacklegged ticks are very small, particularly during the nymph stage, so look carefully.

Will I get Lyme Disease if I get a tick bite?

If you remove a tick quickly (within 24 hours), you can greatly reduce your chances of getting Lyme disease. A black-legged tick has to be attached for a long time before the bacteria make their way into the body — somewhere in the window of 36 to 48 hours. 

How do I remove a tick?

The right way to dispose of a tick is to use tweezers. Grab the part of the tick that's closest to the surface of the skin and pull up gently without twisting. Then make sure to wash the skin with soapy water immediately. Do not use a match, fingernails, needles, Vaseline or gas.

What do I do if I’ve removed a tick?

If you like, you can submit a tick for identification in NS to the Museum of Natural History. Watch for symptoms of Lyme Disease, and talk to your doctor if you suspect you've contracted Lyme Disease.

What are the symptoms of Lyme Disease?

Early signs and symptoms of Lyme disease usually start 3 to 30 days after you have been bitten by an infected blacklegged tick. Most people experience mild flu-like symptoms soon after being bitten, while a small number may have more serious symptoms, sometimes weeks after the bite. Early signs and symptoms of Lyme disease may include:

  • Rash, sometimes shaped like a bull's eye (Erythema migrans (EM rash))
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle and joint aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes

For more information on Lyme disease, please visit https://novascotia.ca/dhw/CDPC/lyme.asp

What MODL is doing

As noted above, the Municipality has committed to funding and working in partnership with the Public Health Agency of Canada on a three-year bait station research project, and with Nova Scotia Public Health on an educational campaign.

  • The bait station program will see bait stations set up in a controlled area of the county, designed to attract and treat deer to reduce or eliminate the population of black legged ticks. If you’re walking in the woods and come across a bait station, please exercise caution and do not touch the bait station.
  • We are developing and funding a public education campaign which includes radio and newspaper ads, a social media campaign and pop up booths at community events. 
  • We have installed additional signage in parks, outdoor facilities and on trails to reinforce the importance of daily tick checks.

Lyme Disease Information presented to Council can be found at the following link, under "2017 Minutes, Agendas and Recordings", and then under "Policy & Strategy 05/16/17":   http://www.modl.ca/municipal-council/agendas-and-minutes/policy-strategy-committee